Thursday, March 25, 2010

CRI Video Promotes Carpet in Healthcare

CRI video - Healthy Patients and Healthy Numbers: The Results of Evidence Based Design - promotes carpet in healthcare

Carpet and Rug Institute Video Titled "Healthy Patients and Healthy Numbers: The Results of Evidence Based Design" Promotes Carpet in Healthcare


Last post [about our video promoting carpet in schools], I talked about how the CRI website has a host of useful resources that aren’t new, but still deserve a second look. Two videos – one for school designers and another for healthcare facility designers – make the case for carpet as a valuable design element that helps people learn and heal better. Produced and written in 2002 by Steve Grass, a talented filmmaker who now works for Mohawk Industries, they feature me as the narrator, long before I came to work at CRI.

The video is titled, “A Short Video on How Interior Design Solutions Aid Healing and Foster Patient Care.” It talks about how:

• For many patients, especially the incontinent, carpet is safer because it helps prevent slip and fall accidents.

Carpet reduces patients’ stress. A nurse on the video says, “You saw it on their faces - you could even see it in their vital signs - their blood pressure, their heart rate - usually wasn’t quite as elevated from stress.”

Technological advances – such as new fibers and construction, new backings, and the increased use of carpet tile, have made carpet even more suitable for healthcare settings.

Carpet costs less over time: CRI studies show how, with proper care and maintenance, carpet saves money in the long run.

Summing up, the video says, “The aesthetic, kinesthetic, and psychological benefits of carpet are accompanied by financial, practical and environmental returns that make carpet a serious contender for your facility’s flooring.”

The video promoting carpet in healthcare is available on CRI’s YouTube channel, and it has its own page titled Healthy Patients and Healthy Numbers: The Results of Evidence Based Design on the CRI website. The page also includes links to a virtual library of studies and documents examining the role of carpet in healthcare settings. Check it out and let me know what you think.

I've embedded it here and included the video transcript below:



---------------------

Healthy Patients and Healthy Numbers: Promoting Carpet in Healthcare


Narrator: It can be argued that some of the most cutting-edge thinking in healthcare is taking place in the area of architectural and interior design. At first the connection between interior design and care for the sick may seem counterintuitive given today’s advances in machines and medicines. In an age when technology scans the body for microscopic flaws and advanced drugs seek out and painlessly neutralize once-deadly bacteria is it any wonder some might question the importance of mere decorations in care of the sick? Wayne Ruga, a world-renowned health care architect, says a critical mass of scientific research has now demonstrated to even the staunchest skeptics that the quality of the physical environment can have a profound influence on improving therapeutic outcomes. At The Carpet and Rug Institute, we’ve studied various applications of carpet in commercial and industrial settings, and we’ve come to a solid conclusion: when used and maintained appropriately, our studies suggest that carpet is an extraordinarily good tool for health care facility designers.

Nurse: It is nicer when there is carpet on the floor, especially when you are doing a twelve hour shift on your feet all day. It is a lot less harsh on your feet - you go home and you’re not as tired - your feet and legs aren’t aching as much.

Narrator: For patients, the comfort underfoot that carpet creates helps reduce stress and makes the hospital a much more homelike environment, while reducing the risks of slips and the injury from a potential fall.

Nurse: When a patient is incontinent and gets up on a hard floor there is a higher risk for falling because it is a slippery surface. Whereas a patient gets up due to incontinence on a carpet it’s not as slippery as a floor - it soaks it for a second and there is no spread of it so there’s less chance for them falling. On a carpeted floor there is traction there and there is a less risk for patient harm. As a nurse, I noticed that my patient was much more relaxed. They weren’t sitting there twiddling their thumbs, they were more in tune with what was going on, but they weren’t anticipating every movement, they were more just in general relaxed. You saw it on their faces - you could even see it in their vital signs - their blood pressure, their heart rate - usually wasn’t quite as elevated from stress for someone waiting to have a surgery.

Narrator: Carpet has new technical product breakthroughs that make it even more suitable for healthcare’s demanding environment. New types of tiled carpet, new ways of manufacturing carpet and improving materials technology are always making carpet a better product. Carpets specifically designed for healthcare facilities can make wheeled furniture use comparable to hard surfaces, and special-application carpet provides greater on-site flexibility. Carpet’s ability to hold on to dirt like a filter is an asset, since it prevents dust and other impurities from reentering the breathing zone, being displaced to other places in the room, or moved about the facility. Soil can be mechanically extracted from the carpet and safely removed.

The Multi-step Maintenance Plan outlined by CRI and approved by all major carpet manufactures provides a model for floor care that maximizes the environmental benefits of carpet. Dirt is contained by mats located at entryways and other areas of heavy traffic. These mats reduce the inflow of outside contaminants – regularly-scheduled vacuuming with a CRI Seal of Approval machine removes contaminants. Spot and spill response teams, either hospital staff or other professionals, deal with localized problems. Deeper, regular-interval professional cleaning preserves the look and feel of carpet and prevents long-term buildup of dirt. Each of these sanitation methods extracts biological elements from the floor and removes them from the indoor environment.

We’d never suggest that carpet is the only floor covering that healthcare providers should consider, but when all of carpet’s benefits are examined, it is a hard act to follow.

Consider carpet and you will discover lower overall costs. We’ll provide you with the numbers that prove it. The aesthetic, kinesthetic, and psychological benefits of carpet are accompanied by financial, practical and environmental returns that make carpet a serious contender for your facility’s flooring. Interior designer Jain Malkin is a bestselling author whose seminal 1992 book, Hospital Interior Architecture, has had a significant impact. She says the benefit of a well-designed healthcare setting is that it allows the patient to relax so that medications and therapies can be more effective. In low stress environments people heal faster. We hope you’ll look over the reference materials we’ve linked to this cd and consider carpet as you plan your institution’s future.

Thank you for watching

And, thanks for reading, too!

~ Bethany

2 comments:

Anonymous said...

Bethany,

I couldn't get brichmod@carpet-rug.org to work. It keeps bouncing back. Any suggestions?

Bethany said...

Hello Anonymous,
If you spell my last name Richmond instead of Richmod, the email will get to me. Try it again!
Bethany Richmond

Related Posts Plugin for WordPress, Blogger...